Friday, January 22, 2016

The Rise of "Creeper Romance" in YA Fiction (And Why it Needs to Stop)


A list of things that people find romantic: chocolate and flowers. Red wine and moonlight. Walks on the beach and diamond rings. Someone saying “I love you” and actually meaning it. Dancing. Creepy stalker people.

Wait, what?

You heard me. Creepy stalker people.
What is my basis for the statement? Only the fact that “creeper romance” has become exceedingly popular in fiction, particularly YA fiction. And everybody seems to be okay with that. In fact, guys with creeper tendencies are considered swoon-worthy by many readers.

I have proof. I also have several reasons as to why this is an extremely unhealthy trend. While I’d like to think that most people are intelligent enough to have discovered this for themselves, I’ve begun to notice that perhaps I give mankind too much credit. My bad. 

Below are a list of characters with stalker/creeper tendencies, along with why they should not be praised as love interests. Please note that this post may rub you wrong, given that some of these characters have a large fanbase. So, before we get started, does anyone want to get out? No? Okay, you have been warned:

Edward Cullen. Stephanie Meyers’ gorgeous, sparkly vampire. I think we all know what I’m going to say about him, but, just in case you don’t, and because I never pass up a good chance to make fun of ridiculous characters, I will elaborate on why Edward Cullen is a creeper. But first, let me ask you a question: if you found out that somebody was following you around and watching you sleep, what would you do? If the same person was also always putting you down and making fun of you, sending dangerous glares in your direction, and then turning around and calling you their “own personal brand of heroin,” what would you do? My hope would be that you would call the police. I don’t care how good-looking the person is. I don’t care how strong or fast the person is. I don’t even care if the person happens to sparkle in the sunlight. Just because a person is gorgeous and in love with you doesn’t automatically make them romantic, harmless, or a good match. 
Source: Crazy Art Ideas

Unfortunately, Bella Swan says otherwise. How on earth is that a good message to be sending? An adult wrote Twilight, and many adults praise it. And people turn around and wonder why so many teenagers are in unhealthy relationships. Yeah. I have no idea why teenagers are making bad dating calls. It’s like everything around them is telling them that it’s okay. Pfft. Absurd.

Evan Walker. For those of you who don’t know, this is the love interest from Ricky Yancey’s The 5th Wave. He’s perfect boyfriend material: he shoots her in the leg, sneaks around her camp while she’s asleep, tries to figure out whether or not he should kill her, reads her diary, stands around outside of her door, and is constantly lying to her. How adorable is that? It’s no wonder the main character falls for him. Sure, she had some misgivings over his creeperisms, but c’mon. His eyes are chocolate-colored, his hands are so soft, he’s saved her life, and he chose not to kill her when he was supposed to. That makes everything okay, right? Um, no. Here we see the idea that unrepentant stalkers should be given a chance if you find yourself a) thinking he’s handsome  b) considering yourself indebted to him or c) flattered that he’s so into you. Flawless logic.

I know I'm about to bring a thousand screaming fangirls down on my head, but....Peeta Mellark. Yep. Peeta has a little bit of creeper in him. Remember that scene that everyone thought was so romantic? The one where he tells Katniss how he fell in love with her after hearing her sing at school? This is how it should’ve gone down:

Peeta: After that, I watched you going home every day. Every day. Well, say something.
Katniss: Uh, Peeta? That’s weird. I’m pretty sure that watching somebody walk home every day is considered stalker. Also, we’re in life-threatening position. I’m scared. I’m worried about my family. I’d really appreciate it if you would just support me in my endeavors to survive, rather than constantly pushing yourself on me. You think you can do that?
Peeta: Your hair was in two braids…
Katniss: Okay, that’s it! I’m leaving.

Sorry, did I just step on Peeta’s moment? Yeah, probably. But seriously, there is nothing cute about a person constantly trying to get your attention even after you’ve said you aren’t interested. And there is absolutely nothing cute about a person showing a rude amount of interest in you.
Barry Allen/The Flash. Not technically a book, but I think it’s interesting that this “creeper romance” trend spans all areas of entertainment, so I wanted to point it out here. Barry never tells his crush (Iris) that he likes her. She is not interested in him, and thus he is never able to get any kind of special attention from her. So of course he visits her multiple times as the mysterious Flash, who she becomes slightly infatuated with. Do I even have to comment on how weird that is? The same situation is repeated in Arrow between Oliver Queen and Laurel, though it's not quite as weird because Laurel has skills that Arrow needs to get certain jobs done. But still. 

Parzival from Ready Player One. In a virtual reality, Parzival follows a blog written by Art3mis. He develops a crush on this girl, spending hours reading her blog, trying to find ways to meet with her, and attempting to discover who she really is outside of the virtual reality. Of course he is rewarded for his tenacity by ending up in some semblance of a relationship with Art3mis. Because people who take their crushes to the extreme deserve to be rewarded. Obviously. 

Ariel. The worst of them all. She secretly keeps a statue of her crush and then proceeds to infiltrate his home. Doesn't get much creepier than that.
In case you're wondering whether I'm being serious or not, I'll tell you: I don't know. Sometimes I can't even tell whether I'm being sarcastic or not. But I am a fan of The Little Mermaid, so I guess I'm kidding. Maybe. Okay, moving on...

Honorable Mentions. I asked my followers on Facebook to list some characters that fall into the "creeper romance" zone. They came up with a lot of great ones. You can check that out here.

What makes the "creeper romance" difficult is that sometimes it isn't extremely obvious. Sometimes the creepers aren't dangerous and are actually decent people (Peeta, Barry Allen....Ariel...?). But that should not make their behavior acceptable, nor should it keep the object of their affection from rebuking them. I'd love to see more girls (...and princes..?) in fiction who speak out against such actions instead of mindlessly accepting it as normal (and even desirable).

Have you noticed any "creeper romance" in any of your own writing? If so, I would urge you to consider rewriting. Why? Because it is very unhealthy to be sending a message that "creeperism" is okay, normal, and bound to turn out well. I've never heard of "creeper romance" working out in real life, so I can't imagine why we should be encouraging such behavior through the actions of our book characters.

What do you think? Agree or disagree? Feel free to point out any characters that I missed (Hint: there are dozens) and weigh in with your own analysis of the "rise of creeper romance."

Related articles:
Romance in YA Novels: The Good, The Bad, and The Stupid
Keeping it Classy: When is it OK to use Profanity in Your Fiction Writing?
Writing Awesome Male Characters: What You're Doing Wrong

Enjoy this post? Take a look around. If you like what you see, please don't forget to subscribe by email for a new post every week! 

SaveSave

60 comments:

  1. An interesting post. I agree that YA fiction could use less of creeper romance. Edward Cullen being the prime example. And I love your inclusion of The Little Mermaid; Ariel certainly fits the bill. Though it won't change my love of that movie in the least.

    I question your adding Peeta Mellark. Yes, I am a huge fan of The Hunger Games, but that's not why. If he really did stalk Katniss the whole way home everyday from school, than by all means he is more than just a bit creepy. But I have to say, I never imagined him doing that. When he admitted to watching Katniss walk home from school everyday I pictured him outside the school talking with his friends, but taking note of her for as long as she was in his range of vision. If I'm just picturing it wrong, than I will definitely concede the point to you; but without further proof of his stalkerish nature I'm going to continue to imagine him as just a bit cowardly and unable to approach the girl he likes.

    P.S. I think you had a beautiful amount of sarcasm for this post! Well done.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like you take on Peeta. I've considered that one, as well. However, it was their first day of school that he heard her sing, and he watches her walk home every day since then (at least 10 years...?). That's an extreme level of dedication, which would make it odd for him to only take casual note of her leaving. I don't think he actually followed her, just stared after her from the schoolyard. Maybe. That's my theory, though I'll admit that they're both equally likely. =D
      Glad you liked the sarcasm! It was unusually strong the day I wrote this post. =D Thanks for the awesome comment!

      Delete
    2. Yes, 10 yrs is a long time to make no move... but based on a comment he makes later on in the books I'm pretty sure he thought she was dating Gale. That's a good reason to hang back. He also tells Katniss that his dad wanted to marry her mom... since that didn't work out, and he thinks she's taken, he was probably assuming he was doomed to the same fate as his father.

      Delete
  2. Ugh, yes, I agree, I seriously can't stand the stalker dudes. Have you read "Hush, Hush?" IT WAS AWFUL!! I seriously wanted to throw the book against the wall. The love interest's whole goal is to kill the main character but he had great abs so it was all good. Plus, you know, he kinda fell in love with her so the whole wanting-to-kill-her-and-stalking thing was all forgiven.

    This is such a great post and I think authors really need to think about what kind of people their love interests are, because creepy is not ok.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have purposely avoided reading "Hush, Hush" because it seemed disturbing. I had no idea that the guy's main goal was to kill her, though. Very messed up. =|

      Delete
  3. This is a great post, describing one of the many examples where our culture is leading us away from healthy definitions of love and romantic relationships. I definitely agree with Victoria in that "Hush, Hush" was terrible in this regard. I found Patch creepy and never finished the series, actually. Peeta is the least terrible on this list, by far, but I do agree that he should have given up before ever bringing his interest in Katniss into the national spotlight. It turned out well for them both, and the Rebellion, so I can kinda forgive him. Kinda. I know I would have HATED that!

    By the way, I caught two Captain America: The Winter Soldier references in this post and they gave me much joy :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep. Peeta has a decent amount of upside. He doesn't even come close to the Cullen/Walker zone. =)

      Ah! You caught both references! *fist bump* You are clearly an epic person. =)

      Delete
  4. When I got this post in my in box I was in the process of writing a post about YA fiction wherein I mention this same thing. I picked the very disturbingly creepy sleep watching moment from Twilight as my example. When I saw the movie, I literally stared at the screen with my mouth open thinking, "That did not just happen." I'll defiantly have to link to you now.

    I'm glad I'm not the only one that thought the little thing Peta pulled with Katniss in the cave was a bit weird. I mean, I support Peta over Gale all the way, but that amount of detail is creepy. Watching someone go home every day? Creepy. It's natural to try and catch a glimpse of your crush before you leave for home, but every day? Come on.

    I've always thought Arial was not right in the head. To risk your life like that for a man? No. At least the original Little Mermaid died in the end. Sorry Little Mermaid fans.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Coincidence? I think not! =) How cool! I'll be looking forward to that post.
      And yes, when I read that part in Twilight, I was so lost. "Wait....People LIKE this guy?"

      Lol! Your assessment of Ariel is correct. I will always love that movie because of the music, but she's a bit off. I liked her in the original Hans Christian Anderson story, though.

      Delete
    2. Although Ariel's devotion to the prince was extreme, I'm not convinced that she falls into the 'stalker' category. Even though she went to such great lengths to meet the prince, she was welcomed into his life and into his home. She was a positive presence that sought to make the prince happy instead of trying to control or possess him.

      In my mind, a stalker is someone who invades one's privacy or trust; takes advantage of someone's weakness or vulnerability for personal gain; and generally uses intimidation, harrassment, and objectivication of the stalkee to gain a sense of control or security.

      Delete
    3. YES. Jessica, that is so true. That's always how I've felt about her, but I couldn't put it into words, so thank you. The fact that Eric was searching for her made it less weird. I mean, they both loved each other. She just found a way to get together with him. Thanks for the comment!

      Delete
    4. Ha, hopefully it's up this week. Editing has got me down.

      Arial is my mom's favorite princess because of the music as well. She has an amazing voice and can belt Part of Your World like nobodies business. I agree, the music is defiantly the movie's best point.

      @Jessica I understand your point and I know Arial is a favorite for a lot of people. She has good points. For example, she's the first Disney Princess that took an active role in moving the plot of her story. And you're right, she's not a murderous psycho- um... high functioning sociopath, who is morbidly fascinated with Eric. That's always a plus. It's just that personally she's not my favorite. If you haven't had the chance, you should check out the Hans Christian Anderson version. It's morbid and freaky.

      Delete
  5. *applauds you*
    *keeps applauding you*
    *is still applauding you three hours later*

    To be honest, I haven't watched/read most of these... but I do have to admit that Ariel wasn't my favorite. She's just a little obsessed with Prince Eric...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm with you C.B. And I haven't seen any of them. I have read Little Mermaid books though.

      Delete
  6. Yeeepp.
    ugh, hate stalker romances. I DO love Best Friend turned romance though. It's a great slow-burn with realistic knowledge about each other. I always feel that stalker romances were written because the author for whatever reason didn't want the relationship to be mutual (as in, they want the heroine to experience falling in love, and they don't think she can do that if she's already in love before the story starts.) It's like a shortcut. :P A lot of authors fail to realize, that you can love someone, and not know that you are IN love with them.

    I haven't read some of these, I'll have to keep them in mind. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Whoa. Good point on the "shortcut." I had never thought of that, but it makes perfect sense.

      Delete
  7. Dear Hannah,

    that's a very interesting post - I haven't thought about that so far. But you're right! Thank you. From the characters you named I only "know" Edward and Peeta, but now I can see the tendencies you mean. I'm sure there are a lot more characters that would fit in your list. If I've got time I maybe write something about that on my blog too. And I defenitly will use that Twilight vs. Tangled picture - it's hilarious (and so true)!

    Greets
    Jacy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the sweet comment, Jacy! That would be so cool if you wrote a similar post. Go for it! And yes, the Twilight vs. Tangled pic is amazing. I saw it on Pinterest and immediately knew that I needed to use it. =D

      Delete
  8. YESYESYESYES I just watched Paper Towns the other day, and I was struck by how creepy the main character was. By every definition, he was a stalker. That got me thinking about how creepy most romantic stories are these days. People find it cute when a character they like is tirelessly pursuing the girl, but the moment someone they DON'T like starts pursuing, it's creepy.

    This is something that has gotten more and more popular, and increasingly creeper-ish.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. To be fair to Paper Towns, the whole point of the book (haven't seen the movie so I can't say for sure how well it translated the message) was that people are just people and shouldn't be put on some pedestal and treated as mysterious beings and puzzles to be solved. Q got obsessed with the idea of figuring out Margot's mystery, but she pretty much shredded him for it. In my opinion, it was treated less as romantic by the end and more of "Wow, dude, look at yourself."

      Delete
    2. Oh, I agree. It was just Paper Towns that made me think about the creeper YA romance.

      Delete
  9. The other day I was looking at Romanticism paintings from the Victoria era, and what annoyed me to no end was that most of them featured a girl doing something, and in almost every single one there would be a guy in the background, watching the girl in a totally creepy way. I guess stalkerism has been considered as romance for a long time . . .
    But I totally agree. Creeperism is not something that should be put in books.

    ReplyDelete
  10. This is such a great post. I particularly hate the "he saved her life so she's obligated to let him court her even if he's a total jerk" theme. As a woman who has served in the military, I know firsthand how dangerous this attitude can be. Owing someone your life doesn't mean you can't say no to him. It's still your life, not his. All you owe him is a thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow. That's a powerful thought. I would like to see a female character in a war situation strait up turn down a guy who saved her life. Because, honestly, if you're saving someone just to get a date, you're doing it for all of the wrong reasons.

      Delete
    2. Yep. I'm with Katherine, Tamara. I read your comment and thought, "Whoa. YES." =)

      Delete
  11. One that is also creepy is from the movie American Beauty when Jane's neighbor Ricky filmed her secretly and she liked it. I especially thought Edward was creepy.

    I actually have this in my book. Its not romance and the protagonist isn't happy about it when she finds out he admires her. But there is a major reason why he is around her. It's a huge spoiler and has a major twist so I can't say.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I hated Peeta. I had the same thoughts about him: what is good about someone who keeps pushing himself on a girl who he knows doesn't return his affection? And he IS super creepy-stalky. I've noticed that in other books, as well. It really gets on my nerves. And not just in modern books. One of my least favourite books of all time is Jane Eyre, because Mr. Rochester, the romantic interest, is incredibly stalky and abusive.
    Anyhow, great post! Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I used to feel the same way about Rochester. However, the book doesn't reward Rochester's behavior. In fact, Jane Eyre is one of the few books that shows consequences and Jane actually leaving Rochester after finding out what he has done. It's really fascinating just how in control she is. She refuses his gifts, continues teaching Adele, and keeps Rochester at a distance despite him wanting to get cozy during their engagement. I'd give it a reread and focus on Jane's views and actions.

      Delete
  13. I wanted to thank you for this great read. Your blog is one of the finest blog . Thanks for posting this informative article.
    purpose of academic writing

    ReplyDelete
  14. Interesting post :)

    I don't think I felt Peeta was being a creeper, probably because he was just to young. I mean the first day of school was before her father died so she wasn't 11 or 12 yet? (it's been awhile since I read the books) I also had the feeling that Katniss had to pass the bakery on her way home. I don't know why I had that idea, but it was a feeling I had. Anyway, if their homes were on the same route he didn't follow her so much as take advantage of the situation.

    Ariel is a prime example of the weird romantic notions of most fairy tales. A prince sees a beautiful girl and decides to marry her. The girl doesn't get to have an opinion. If she does have an opinion she will be taken down a peg through difficult circumstances after which she will gratefully accept the prince. In that sense, Ariel is one step ahead of the other princesses because she chose him first. I guess that says a lot about marriage in the old days...

    Edward was definitely a creeper. I don't know any of the others but your description was clear enough!

    I think the creeper romance has to do with an absence of parents in these stories and a lack of siblings or friends who can offer some perspective. Bella doesn't rely on her parents much (as far as I could tell from book 1)and it takes her awhile to make new friends. Katniss has been taking care of her mother and sister since her father died. She only has one friend with whom she can't communicate during the Games. (Ariel also seems to be without a mother although I'm not sure).

    YA girls with a healthier attitude towards relationships tend to have a bigger support system of either family, friends or both.
    In that way, it's quite realistic since girls who lack a supportive system are the most vulnerable to creeper guys. Unfortunately in the real world, these relationships turn very ugly pretty soon.

    ReplyDelete
  15. This is an excellent post. I feel you on all these guys, though I never really considered Peeta in a "stalkerish" light I can see where one could draw that from. Edward Cullen is just the worst.
    Obviously Christian Grey is not a YA character (thank goodness) but he was the first one that came to mind when I read your title.
    I have a medieval fantasy that I'm in the process of writing where I am guilty of this trope, however, it's a relationship portrayed in a negative light and it never grows into a two-sided romance. I think you're right when you say that creeper romances aren't actually a thing in real life, so I definitely wasn't about to let that one come to pass. :P
    Very nice post! I just recently discovered your blog and other social media and I'm reading up on all your articles (does that make me fall under the creeper category? Whoops!). I really love your content though and I'll certainly be back for more.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Totally agree. Creeperism is not healthy and NOT okay. I don't know why it's been so romanticized! >_>

    ReplyDelete
  17. Loved your post and totally agree with you. We need to get more stories out there showing healthy relationships for girls (and maybe how they leave when the relationships aren't healthy? Ah, a revolutionary thought . . .)This post will make me a little more aware of "creeper tendencies" creeping into my own work -- thanks! :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Revolutionary indeed. I like the way you think. It would be nice to be able to use fiction as a way to give people good ideas rather than bad rolemodels. =)

      Delete
  18. Oh but gosh I remember being a teenager and being overly into someone and it also happening to me by the boy. Teenagers go all in or not at all with their feelings. I imagine there are better ways to write it...I guess. But I'm also guessing all teens like reading this style because they can connect to the intensity of that subject.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Okay, not all teens like this writing style. You can't say all teens like anything. Teens are people with individual personalities and individual opinions. It is true that when we are younger, we find it easier to dive headfirst into a relationship without wondering if we might get hurt, and there is value in that, but it can also lead to very bad choices. I think one of the things YA romance novels ought to do for teens is help them learn the hard lessons without needing to make all of those mistakes themselves.

      Delete
  19. Sent this link to to every friend I have ever had the "But Edwards a f***ing stalker!" argument with (which is a worryingly high number).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lol! It is disturbing how often we have to explain that to people, isn't it?

      Delete
  20. I love this post! I'm always glad to meet other people who agree that stalkers do not make good love interests. Many people seem to think it doesn't matter because it's "just" fiction. But research points out that fiction teaches makes us more empathetic. Do we really want to be more empathetic in this regard?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I'm glad you enjoyed it. And, like you, I've never understood the phrase "just fiction." If your mind doesn't resist going certain places in books, that it won't resist going to those same places in real life.

      Delete
  21. I just finished the 5th Wave, and I would like to point out that I loved it because she has a flashback to a 'creep' commenting that if he was beautiful she wouldn't detest him, and she seriously considers that effect on her relationship with Evan. I'm hoping that this sort of philosophical thinking remains prevalent in the rest of the series. While I agree that this is an issue, I've found that the best writers confront it and overcome it.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I'm a little late to the party but and I know its not technically a book however I'm sitting here watching The Amazing Spiderman II and Peter is totally stalking Gwen Stacy. I understand they just broke up and its a bummer but really literally stalking her and in the first Spiderman movies, he does a little stalking of Mary Jane. Are we just noticing this now or has this started to become acceptable?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are totally right about The Amazing Spiderman. I always found that bit disturbing, especially because people think it's cute. It's becoming an acceptable, even romantic, thing to do. I assume it has something to do with people thinking it's romantic to go to such lengths to be near a person you love, but still. There are other, less creepy ways to do that. =)

      Delete
  23. Spot on with this article, I really think this website needs more attention. I'll probably be back to read more, thanks for the info.
    essay writing service uk

    ReplyDelete
  24. Thanks for the post. Im a big fan of the blog, i've even put a little bookmark right on the tool bar of my Firefox you'll be happy to find out!
    purpose of academic writing

    ReplyDelete
  25. I really like the fresh perpective you did on the issue. I will be back soon to check up on new posts! Thank you!
    Tutoring

    ReplyDelete
  26. Yes! I remember reading a book (Fallen by Lauren Kate) that just made me incredibly angry. Both characters were as bad as each other. The female character was a stalker that didn't understand 'no' and the male character was emotionally abusive. Well, they were both abusive. It was a typical good vs evil fantasy fiction. Except I wanted the villain to kill the main characters (I gave the author too much credit).

    The only reason I finished the book is because I was naive. I kept thinking (hoping?) 'okay, maybe the author will kill these characters because they are awful beings'. 'Maybe it will turn out the villain is the heroine and it only seems otherwise because the pov is from (awful main female character)'. Yeah, nope, the same formula except with abusive characters as the 'heroes'. Urgh!

    I know there's this rant the villain does about the main female character and I was like 'YES, EXACTLY!'. The 'true love' romance was basically a 'How NOT to behave' guide. It was terrible. On the semi-upside, it's a good guide to compare my characters with. Although, it's so terrible it makes the romance in Twilight look decent.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ew. That does not sound like a book I would enjoy, either. It's so odd that people find this acceptable in fiction. But, like you said, books like those certainly serve as a good reminder of why we shouldn't write like that. =)

      Delete
  27. I have read this above post its very greatful for me thanks sharing this post ,great post.
    root android phone,
    root android without pc

    ReplyDelete

  28. Wonderful post! this share best article and thoughts and provide best community in all over the world. Special thanks for this post and getting good services of this sites.
    imgfave
    kinja tips
    ncdextip

    ReplyDelete
  29. Good one post that provides wonderful information about the topic. Thanks for sharing. Dissertation writing service

    ReplyDelete
  30. I agree with review that you have posted. I have read this book and have same views as you have. Cheap dissertation writing service

    ReplyDelete
  31. Thanks for giving this apporchnity to post a comment in your commuty is a nice post sharin by you thanks.
    headsbookt
    hidpost
    classifiehigl

    ReplyDelete
  32. I like the unforgettable information you afford in your articles. Coursework Writing Service UK I will bookmark your weblog and check again here often. I'm rather persuaded I'll learn lots of new stuff right here!


    ReplyDelete
  33. Get dissertation provides dissertation and assignment in valuable price in students please visit it: Dissertation Writing Services

    ReplyDelete
  34. Your blog have allot of detail about the school assemblies it's good job.
    school assemblies

    ReplyDelete
  35. Ok, I know I'm very late to the discussion, but I really enjoyed it. This is a horrible trend in YA that has been going on for some time; presumably because the authors want to make the female MC look more feminine by not being the 'chaser' in the relationship. Don't get me wrong, I wasn't a forward YA when it came to relationships at all, but neither did I find it flattering when a photographer asked me out and suggested I do a photo shoot for our date. Yup. I know a creeper pretty quick when I meet one. I didn't mind Edward Cullen too much, Peeta was too pathetic for me to be creepy. Hush hush was also mentioned in a comment, and the only residing memory I have of that book was that EVERY character needed to be three steps away from a nuclear test. The main one for me within the last year is the Court of... series by Sarah J Maas. She turned the most sexually aggressive and abusive character into the Soul Mate (not just a mere love interest). His actions were then explained away later on as protecting the female character (he was just showing the ultra evil female villain who he was sleeping with, that he didn't care about the girl who's his mate by drugging her and having her parade around semi naked etc). Sooooo not cool. What was even more not cool was that female character by the end of the second book has been in three sexually abusive relationships: first as the bit on the side to a man who is going to marry someone else; then she falls in love with love interest 1 who turns out to be a control freak who locks her in her room, choses her wedding dress etc; then she gets 'rescued' from bad love interest 1 by bad love interest 2 (you know, the one who was drugging her and exploiting her).

    ReplyDelete

Google Analytics Alternative